EDSIGCON Proceedings 2020

Virtual Conference, November 2020

Conference Highlights


2021 EDSIG Proceedings: Abstract Presentation


Technology Program Enrollments At Schools of Business And How To Help Meet The Labor Demand For Professionals


Mark Pisano
Southern Connecticut State University

Katarzyna Toskin
Southern Connecticut State University

Abstract
Technology and all of the supporting systems have become major facets of everyday life. As technology advances and new innovations are brought forward, this intertwining and dependency on technology grows. There is a clear need for students to have an understanding of how technology can be utilized, managed, and have a meaningful impact on consumers, business, and society. Many universities and facilities of higher learning offer educational programs in the study of technology, information systems, information technology, management information systems, or business information systems. According to the United States Department of Labor, computer related fields will continue to grow by six percent through the year 2029. Additionally, the data science field will continue to grow by thirty-one percent through the year 2029. With the demand for quality graduates to fill positions in data analysis, systems analyst, technology specialist, application analyst, and cyber security one would expect these programs in higher education facilities to have high student enrollment. The American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) is an accrediting body for schools of business across the world. Many of the member schools offer a technology related program such as management information systems or business information systems. Additionally, member schools offer programs in management among the many other business disciplines. Research has been done into the low enrollment of information systems, information technology, management information systems, or business information systems programs but not specifically business schools. Additionally, work has also been conducted on mechanisms to measure this enrollment and also how to improve enrollment in these areas of study but again there is no specifics to how schools of business are impacted. Among the many AACSB accredited universities and facilities of higher learning who offer programs in the study of technology along with programs in management or other relatable fields, what is enrollment like for technology programs? Are students forgoing enrollment in management information systems or business information systems programs to study management or perhaps computer science? If that is the case, then why did the students decide to do that? Is there to much confusion as to what programs can lead to what type of employment, so students choose the clearly defined option? How can enrollments be improved at AACSB universities and facilities of higher learning who offer competing programs?